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Huntsville Social Security Disability FAQs

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Who is Eligible for Disability Benefits from Social Security?

Who Decides if I'm Disabled and Eligible for Benefits?

Are Mental Illnesses Eligible for Disability Benefits?

My Doctor Says I'm Disabled so Why is Social Security Denying My Disability Claim?

If I Win My Case, Will I Receive Medical Help in Addition to Cash Benefits?

How Does Social Security Decide/Determine if I'm Disabled?

How Can I Find Out if My Medical Condition Qualifies for Disability Benefits?

If I Win My Case, How Much Money will I Receive?

If I Need to Apply, What Should I Do?

If I Applied, But I was Denied, What Should I Do?

What will Happen at My Hearing?

What is the Difference Between a Lawyer and a Non-Attorney Advocate?

Is Hill & Jordan Very Experienced in Social Security Disability?

How Much Does it Cost to Hire an Attorney for My Disability Case?

Will Hill & Jordan Represent Me at a Hearing if One is Necessary?

When Should I Contact an Attorney About Representation?

Why Do I Need a Lawyer to Help Me? Why Should I Hire Hill & Jordan?

Who is Eligible for Disability Benefits from Social Security?

Under Social Security rules, you're only considered disabled (and eligible for benefits) if a medical condition or injury is expected to keep you from working for at least 12 months. The disability can be a physical condition, a mental condition, or a combination of both.

Who Decides if I'm Disabled and Eligible for Benefits?

After a Social Security disability claim is filed, the case is sent to a disability examiner. The examiner makes the initial decision on the claim.

Are Mental Illnesses Eligible for Disability Benefits?

Yes. Mental illness is a frequently used basis for getting Social Security Disability benefits.

My Doctor Says I'm Disabled so Why is Social Security Denying My Disability Claim?

It's not up to your doctor to determine whether you are disabled. It's up to Social Security to make their own decision regardless of what your doctor thinks.

If I Win My Case, Will I Receive Medical Help in Addition to Cash Benefits?

That depends. If you've been eligible for Social Security Disability for two years — whether you've actually received the benefits or not — you qualify for Medicare. If you're awarded Supplemental Security Income (SSI), you won't receive Medicare, but rather Medicaid, a needs-based program that provides for a number of prescriptions and doctor visits each month.

How Does Social Security Decide/Determine if I'm Disabled?

Every case is unique, but typically, the Social Security Administration has two defining criteria to determine if you're "disabled."

1) You must be unable to do any substantial work because of your medical, physical, or mental condition.

2) Your medical condition must have lasted, or is expected to last, at least one year or be expected to result in death.

How Can I Find Out if My Medical Condition Qualifies for Disability Benefits?

The Social Security Administration considers your condition severe if it interferes with such basic work functions as:

1) Physical abilities like walking, standing, sitting, lifting, pushing, pulling, reaching, carrying or handling.

2) Seeing, hearing or speaking.

3) Responding appropriately to supervisors, co-workers and typical work situations, and the ability to understand and complete simple instructions.

If I Win My Case, How Much Money will I Receive?

For Social Security Disability benefits, it all depends upon how much you have worked and earned in the past. For disabled widow's or widower's benefits, it depends upon how much your late husband or wife worked and earned. For disabled adult child benefits, it all depends upon how much the parent worked and earned.

First you contact Social Security. Second you will need to provide information on your medical conditions, treatment, medication, and work history. You can apply online at www.ssa.gov, call (800) 772-1213, or call us today at Hill & Jordan.

If I Applied, But I was Denied, What Should I Do?

Now you file a written request for reconsideration within 60 days of the denial notice. After there are four levels of review: Reconsideration, Hearing, Appeals Council, and Federal Court. At this point, you are strongly encouraged to get legal help so call us now for a free consultation.

What will Happen at My Hearing?

A hearing is conducted by the Office of Disability Adjudication & Review of the Social Security Administration. An Administrative Law Judge will preside over your case and a testimony is taken under oath.

The hearing is also private. The only people present will be the Judge and the Judge's assistant, you, your attorney, and any witnesses you may want to have present. Often the Judge may ask a vocational expert to testify about your ability to work.

Medical records and a medical expert will be accepted as evidence. The Judge or your attorney will ask you about your present medical condition, medical history, abilities, education, training, work experience and the limitations in your daily life caused by your disability. You or your attorney may make a closing argument that you are entitled to benefits under Social Security.

What is the Difference Between a Lawyer and a Non-Attorney Advocate?

Non-attorney disability advocates are trained in the Social Security process, but have not received a law degree. They can help you file your initial claim, but if your claim is denied (and most are) you may need sound legal counsel to proceed to the next step. If your appeal goes all the way to federal court, you will definitely need an attorney.

If you have questions about your eligibility, you should probably be working with an attorney. At Hill & Jordan, we can start you off with a free consultation of your disability claim. Call us today for help.

Is Hill & Jordan Very Experienced in Social Security Disability?

Yes. Cliff Hill has helped thousands of people in North Alabama and the Tennessee Valley get the disability benefits they need — and paid for — when they can't work. Whether you need to file for the first time, or if you were denied, let Cliff help you get benefits.

How Much Does it Cost to Hire an Attorney for My Disability Case?

Federal law regulates attorneys' fees in Social Security disability cases. So, virtually every disability lawyer works on the same fee basis. The lawyer's fee is 25% of the past due disability benefits you get. There is no fee if you lose.

Will Hill & Jordan Represent Me at a Hearing if One is Necessary?

Absolutely. We're not like some firms where you won't meet your attorney or representative until moments before your hearing. We’ll work with you and meet with you (whether in-person or by phone) before your hearing ever takes place.

Cliff Hill has represented thousands of clients during their hearings and would like to help you. If you were denied benefits or have an upcoming hearing, call our office today.

When Should I Contact an Attorney About Representation?

You should contact an attorney before you file a claim with the Social Security Administration. Cliff Hill can help you plan a strategy to win your case from the beginning. If you wait to get an attorney after your claim has been denied, you may harm your case with different damaging statements or other information. This information can be used against you on appeal.

Why Do I Need a Lawyer to Help Me? Why Should I Hire Hill & Jordan?

Social Security statistics show that claimants who are represented by lawyers win more often than those who are not represented. Your best chance of winning your case against the government is to be represented by a lawyer.

At Hill & Jordan, we've helped thousands of people in North Alabama win disability benefits. Call us today for a free evaluation of your disability claim.

Our personal injury attorneys will do our best to reconstruct your accident and prove who's at fault and who should pay. If you were injured and thing you have a personal injury, call us today for a free consultation.

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